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[personal profile] bookgazing2017-03-28 08:13 am

Read. Remember. Resist. (Feb 2017 Edition)

Everything is A LOT at the moment, right? It can feel like everything is out of our control. Our actions get drowned out by newsreels of permanent despair, and every new dawn brings a chorus of 'Those fuckers did what now?' It's easy to believe what fascists want us to believe - nothing we do makes a difference and we may as well give up.

To counter this narrative, which is designed to keep us from beating them down, I thought it might be useful to start signal-boosting things that got DONE over the course of a month. My goal - to produce a five-item list, each month, of ways people improved the world and made a difference, big or small, in the middle of this political wasteland. Regular people are pushing back, and resistance is anything but futile.
Read more... )
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Sidetracks - March 23, 2017

Sidetracks is a collaborative project featuring various essays, videos, reviews, or other Internet content that we want to share with each other. All past and current links for the Sidetracks project can be found in our Sidetracks tag.


Read more... )
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[personal profile] bookgazing2017-03-22 11:52 am

Wonder Woman - Official Origin Trailer

So, the latest Wonder Woman trailer is out and I have watched it approximately twenty times.

Just look at it.



Here are just five things I love about this new trailer for one of my most anticipated cinema events of 2017. Wonder Woman is going to be in a movie, everyone!

Read more... )
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[personal profile] renay2017-03-21 05:37 pm

Let's Get Literate! February Reading

Winter releases this time around felt a little subdued. I don't know if that's because of politics or whether it's saying something about the books coming out. In February there were some hyped releases, like The Stars Are Legion by Kameron Hurley (which I had to tap out of) and A Conjuring of Light by V.E. Schwab (I still need to read the second book), but otherwise I didn't feel the same energetic push for other titles that I'm used to. Of course, I'm behind on the brand spanking new because what is time management (I don't know, even having read a time management self-help book). Read more... )
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Adventures Elsewhere — February 2017

Adventures Elsewhere collects our reviews, guest posts, articles, and other content we've spread across the Internet recently! See what we've been up in our other projects. :D


Read more... )
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[personal profile] renay2017-03-14 01:20 am

The Lending Shelf of My Dreams

Today, I'm doing a collaboration project with Jenny, Claire, and Chelsea! They'll have posts/videos up at their projects today, so definitely check them out.

I was super happy when they all agreed to come do this with me, because there's nothing I like more than ~seducing~ people into reccing books. My tombstone, probably: "She really liked recs. Like, really." There's an art to recommending books: figuring out your audience, trying to remember what books you've read, and deciding which they might take to. So recs can be pretty specific to each individual, but there are some books that you lie in wait with for every reccing opportunity available...just in case. I wondered: if I had a shelf with extra copies of ten books only for lending to people, regardless of their tastes, what books would I stock?

This is that list. Read more... )

Be sure to check out Jenny, Claire, and Chelsea! I'm sure their lists will be GREAT, and then after you've seen all the lists you'll be inspired to make your own and you'll @ me on Twitter to tell me about it...right? #seduction
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Sidetracks - March 10, 2017

Sidetracks is a collaborative project featuring various essays, videos, reviews, or other Internet content that we want to share with each other. All past and current links for the Sidetracks project can be found in our Sidetracks tag.


Read more... )
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Favorite Short Fiction of 2016 by Forestofglory

We're super happy to welcome [personal profile] forestofglory back to Lady Business to discuss her favorite short fiction of 2016! [personal profile] forestofglory is a long time friend of the blog and also one of the organizers behind creating a YA Award for Worldcon. You can vote on the future award name at bit.ly/worldconya . Now onto some recs!


Hi everyone. I'm [personal profile] forestofglory and I'm here to talk about 2016 short fiction. I read a fair amount of SFF short fiction, though not even close to all that is published each year. I mostly read short fiction online, but also read anthologies and collections, and sometime even print magazines (which I get from my local library). 2016 wasn't a great reading year for me. I was battling depression, overwhelmed by U.S. political events, and was the parent of an infant. So I read an even smaller share of the stories published this year than in the past. Still, I wanted to share some of my favorites with everyone.

Like all reviewers I have my own idiosyncrasies. I like domestic tasks and family relationships and I prefer cheerful stories to grim ones. So of course my favorite stories reflect that. This year I read many, many grim stories, but you won't find many of them on this list. Some of them were great stories, but they weren't my favorites.

I've broken these down by Hugo categories for those of you nominating for awards. Read more... )
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Nerd Adventures: Beyond Orwell at Housing Works

President's Day was a day off for me, which meant two things: one, I'd spent the afternoon at a Not My President's Day rally, and two, the low-level depressive miasma Rachel Dratch characterizes as Sunday feeling had stretched into Monday.

To be perfectly honest, Sunday feeling might be the best way to sum up the last few months since the election for me. Which I’m not mentioning for sympathy—ugh, cry more, employed middle-class white femme citizen—but just to let you know where I’ve been for the last few months. Which was… not much of anywhere, emotionally and intellectually speaking.

When I was finally able to lift my head up and keep it up, I found myself—not transformed, but in the process of transformation. I’ve never felt that before. Every instance of evolution in my life has been noticed after the fact. It can be unsettling to actively experience in real time, but I’m trying to embrace the fact that I’m changing. This is yet another opportunity to define what kind of woman I want to be and then go be her. But it can be unsettling, because there are some deep foundational shifts occurring.

For example: I used to be a pop culture junkie. And now I’m now sure what I am.

(Besides, of course, angry.)

Read more... )
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Our Favourite Media of January 2017

Each month, we look back over the media we loved in the previous month, from books to film to video games and more. There's still lots of art out there to love. ♥


Read more... )
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[personal profile] renay2017-02-27 12:26 pm

Let's Get Literate! Revenger by Alastair Reynolds

Revenger had all the things that sounded directly up my alley:
  • sisters leaving home to have adventures
  • ladies learning cool new things about the world
  • heists at dangerous locales
  • pirates!
  • ominous tales of a ruthless captain
  • bloody revenge
  • team ups
Friends, it is true that this book contains all of those things and they were wonderful. Not only did I get those, Alastair Reynolds read my mind and gave me the following:
  • robot pals
  • grudging partnerships
  • ladies being brutal in order to save people they love and themselves
  • cool gadgets
  • mysterious worldbuilding
Read more... )
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Sidetracks - February 23, 2017

Sidetracks is a collaborative project featuring various essays, videos, reviews, or other Internet content that we want to share with each other. All past and current links for the Sidetracks project can be found in our Sidetracks tag.


Read more... )
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[personal profile] spindizzy2017-02-24 01:38 am

Eight Book Minimum: When are my feelings NOT conflicted?

I have read SO MUCH prose this time around! Honestly, I forgot how long it takes, it feels like I spent forever with the same books, even if GoodReads tells me it was only a couple of days with each. People who read prose exclusively: how do you do this all the time?! Are you all wizards?!

(ALSO I am bringing back "*" on the book list as a marker for "This book contains rape/discussion of rape," so please bear that in mind and look after yourselves, okay?)


  1. The Convergence of Fairy Tales by Octavia Cade [Jump] *

  2. Hunter's Way by Gerri Hill [Jump] *

  3. In The Name of the Father by Gerri Hill [Jump] *

  4. Partners by Gerri Hill [Jump]

  5. Arsenic For Tea by Robin Stevens [Jump]

  6. Nimona by Noelle Stevenson [Jump]

  7. Gangsta:Cursed Volume One by Kohske and Syuhei Kamo [Jump]

  8. Dogs Disco by Joe Decie [Jump]


Read more... )

Reading Goals


Reading goal: 16/150 (8 new this post) Prose: 7/50 (6 new this post)
New-to-me female authors: 4/75 (3 new this post: Octavia Cade, Gerri Hill, Noelle Stevenson)
#getouttamydamnhouse: 9/90 (4 gone this post)
#unofficialqueerasfuckbookclub: 4/16 (4 new this post; Hunter's Way, In The Name of the Father, Partners and Nimona)
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2017 Hugo Nomination Recommendations

Another year, another Hugo nomination season! Once again, nominations for the Hugo Awards are open, to anyone who is currently a member of this year's upcoming Worldcon in Helsinki, last year's Worldcon in Kansas City, or next year's Worldcon in San Jose, CA ["a.k.a., my neck of the woods. Come to San Jose! We'll all hang out!! It'll be great!!!" — KJ]. Nominations are open until mid-March (March 17th or 18th, depending on your time zone), so that's plenty of time to read all those things you've been meaning to get to before nominations close… right?

Never fear, the editors of Lady Business are here to provide our suggestions as you decide what to prioritize on your TBR. Of course, this is by no means a comprehensive list of everything that might be worthy of a Hugo nomination, nor is it meant to be. It's just a selection of some of the things we loved in 2016, and a few reasons why we loved them, along with some books, stories, and shows we're still hoping to check out ourselves. Each editor's opinions are their own, although we suspect you'd find a fair amount of agreement if we had sat down to discuss our picks.

Onward to the list! )
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[personal profile] bookgazing2017-02-10 08:22 pm

Read. Remember. Resist.

Everything is A LOT at the moment, right? Trump. Brexit. Aleppo. And this whole Marie le Pen thing is starting to look far too plausible. It can feel like everything is out of our control. Our actions get drowned out by newsreels of permanent despair, and every new dawn brings a chorus of 'Those fuckers did what now?' It's easy to believe what the fascists want us to believe - nothing we do makes a difference and we may as well give up.

To counter this narrative, in my own small way, I thought it might be useful to start signal-boosting things that got DONE over the course of a month. My goal - to produce a five-item list, each month, of ways people improved the world and made a difference in the middle of this political wasteland. Regular people are pushing back, and resistance is anything but futile.Read more... )
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[personal profile] spindizzy2017-02-10 02:13 am

Eight Book Minimum: Start as you mean to go on! No, wait, the other thing!

I feel like it says a lot about me as a person that I go "Okay, I will read lots of prose books by new authors" and promptly start on three massive manga re-read projects. And also that I swap between Important Seminal Manga That Is Critically Beloved and the Sparkly Shipbait Idfic. START AS YOU MEAN TO GO ON, I GUESS.

I have also spotted the slight flaw in my #getouttamydamnhouse goal, which that I hadn't accounted for what I was going to do when I... Happened to the library? Having a target that keeps going up incrementally is a good way to discourage yourself, so I am keeping my goal fixed at ninety (oh god past!me what were you doing) and when I get to June I'm gonna count up how many library books I have left in my house and adjust my goal accordingly.


  1. Pluto Volume 1 by Naoki Urasawa and Osamu Tezuka [Jump]

  2. Pluto Volume 2 by Naoki Urasawa and Osamu Tezuka [Jump]

  3. Pandora Hearts Volume 1 by Jun Mochizuki [Jump]

  4. Pandora Hearts Volume 2 by Jun Mochizuki [Jump]

  5. Pluto Volume 3 by Naoki Urasawa and Osamu Tezuka [Jump]

  6. Pandora Hearts Volume 3 by Jun Mochizuki [Jump]

  7. Pandora Hearts Volume 4 by Jun Mochizuki [Jump]

  8. The Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman [Jump]


Read more... )

Reading Goals


Reading goal: 8/150 (8 new this post)
New-to-me female authors: 1/75 (1 new this post: Genevieve Cogman)
#getouttamydamnhouse: 5/90 (5 gone this post)
#unofficialqueerasfuckbookclub: 0/8 (0 new this post)
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Adventures Elsewhere — January 2017

Adventures Elsewhere collects our reviews, guest posts, articles, and other content we've spread across the Internet recently! See what we've been up in our other projects. :D


Read more... )
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Fanwork Recs - February 2, 2017

Fanwork is awesome and sharing fanwork is even more awesome. Join us as we keymash and squee over our favorite fanwork, from fic (both written and podfic) to art to vids and meta and back again.

If you find something you love, we encourage you to comment/favorite and let the creator know you enjoyed their work. :D


Recommendations included:
  • Critical Role — fic (1)
  • Dramatical Murder — art (1)
  • Hidden Figures — art (2)
  • The Magnificent Seven (2016) — fic (1)
  • Marvel — art (1)
  • Monstress — vid (1)
  • Ms. Marvel — art (1)
  • The West Wing — vid (1)
  • Yuri!!! On Ice — art (2)


On to the recs! )

What fanwork have you loved recently?
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Xena: Episode 2x11, "Here She Comes... Miss Amphipolis"

Clare & Renay's Adventures in: Xena


In a time without a Black Widow movie on the horizon, two fans in turmoil cried out for a heroine. She was Xena, a mighty female protagonist forged in the fires of Hercules: The Legendary Journeys. The action, the camp, the queer subtext. Her adventures will rock their worlds.


Clare: Did I mention last time that the greatest part of Xena is that it supplies its own tropes? Well, Xena continues that trend, as Xena and Gabrielle go undercover at a beauty pageant (beating Miss Congeniality by three years) in order to suss out a would-be killer.Read more... )
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6 New Nonfiction Reads for 2017

We're thrilled to welcome friend of the blog, Jenny, back to Lady Business to talk about some of the nonfiction she's read or planning to read going forward. Onward for some awesome nonfiction recs!


Happy 2017, Lady Business readers! Or I guess I should say, solemn 2017, Lady Business readers. I hope we come to this new year with hope and bravery, ready to fight and call our senators and support each other. Here’s some of the nonfiction I’ll be reading in my spare time from resisting our Russian stooge cheeto president.

cover for The Fire Next Time


The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin
All throughout December 2016, I told myself that my first read in 2017 was going to be James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time, followed closely by the collection of essays, poems, and reflections The Fire This Time, edited by Jesmyn Ward. I like the symbolism of starting the first year of the Trump presidency with an author as eloquent, timely, and furious as James Baldwin. I hope that the reminder that these battles never went away will help me to have the strength to keep on fighting throughout the year (and the one after it, and the one after).

The Fall of the House of Wilde


The Fall of the House of Wilde by Emer O’Sullivan
Okay, this will not cast me in the most flattering light, so bear with me. My friend sent me an article entitled "10 Things You Probably Didn’t Know about Oscar Wilde," written by Emer O’Sullivan and probably not targeted to someone like me who has a whole Oscar Wilde shelf in the nonfiction section of her personal library. After guessing five of the things without clicking on the article, then perishing of indignation while reading it because of how little Emer O’Sullivan seems to like Oscar Wilde, the most likeable man in all of human history, I added The Fall of the House of Wilde to my reading list. I look forward to disagreeing with all of the author’s conclusions.

Cosmopolites: The Coming of the Global Citizen


Cosmopolites: The Coming of the Global Citizen by Atossa Araxia Abrahamian
In 2016, I learned about a stateless group called the bidoon who live (among other places) in the United Arab Emirates. Because the UAE does not like giving away citizenships, they came up with the solution of buying citizenships to the Comoros, a tiny, coup-prone island nation off the east coast of Africa, and bestowing them willy-nilly upon the bidoon. Strange, right? I absolutely love it when I discover odd little pockets of knowledge like this, and The Cosmopolites promises to give me more detail on the bidoon and other weirdnesses of citizenships bought and sold. Abrahamian explores the market in citizenships and what that market has to say about trends toward globalization and inequality.

Brazil: A Biography


Brazil: A Biography by by Lilia M. Schwarcz and Heloisa Starling
I am not giving up on my project to read one good history of every country in Africa, but I am not going to turn down a good history of a country in South America when Farrar, Straus, and Giroux drops one on my metaphorical doorstep. Coming in July 2017, this massive book promises to increase my knowledge of Brazilian culture and modern history by approximately 100%. Marketing materials have promised me that it’s a truly interdisciplinary book that deals with race and pop culture and economic changes. Yes thank you, I believe I will.

The Sixth Extinction


The Sixth Extinction by Elizabeth Kolbert
Elizabeth Kolbert published this book in 2014, and then for two and a half years, I didn’t trust my ability to comprehend Science sufficiently to read it. I kind of still don’t, but nevertheless, this is the year I’m finally going to read The Sixth Extinction. I first encountered it when the Best American Science and Nature Writing featured an excerpt from it that taught me about how we developed the concept of extinction, an idea I had never previously considered we had needed to discover. The rest of the book—which deals with exactly how comprehensively we are fucking up the planet for our fellow species—promises to be just as illuminating.

Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest


Twitter and Tear Gas: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest by Zeynep Tufekci
Something tells me that we’ll be leveraging social media as we wage our many protests over the next four years. Tufekci’s book Twitter and Tear Gas, forthcoming in May 2017, explores the role of internet actors in uprisings from the Arab Spring to the Occupy Wall Street movement to the recent coup attempt in Turkey. I love that she’s exploring protest movements in a range of different countries, and I hope to come away from her book with a better grasp on how to maximize the impact of protests and use social media tools to support people on the ground in locations where I can’t be.

What nonfiction are you looking forward to this year? "All of it" is an acceptable answer to the question.